New York Wheel Estate

At one of the first community meetings I attended , a Staten Island woman home renovation approached me. Her name was Frizzi Linck and she is a voice pathologist and a resident of St. George. She was all swaddled up with a baby on her chest. She had a simple request; could our open space green roof include a playground for both local children like hers and possibly for visitors with small children. I said we would look into it. I’m sure she thought it was a standard non-committal response.

As I have previously explained in this blog, we have over 5 acres of planned open space on our green roof, with undulating hills and paths winding amongst the sustainability exhibit and its alternative energy generators (photovoltaic solar cells and vertical wind turbines). There was one portion of the roof plan, the Western-most portion near Nicholas Street which seemed lonely and underutilized.

So much to everyone’s surprise, we said yes, we would include a playground. When I next saw Frizzi, it was at a Community Board meeting and during the Q&A she asked again about the playground. This time I told her we had one planned based on her request. I’m not sure she believed me. Such is the inherent distrust for the developer in modern American society. While I’m sure it is a reputation that is well-earned, we consider ourselves less developers and more wheel builders. That may sound trite, but this is the only project we have underway and we are totally focused on doing it the right way to create a world-class venue that emphasizes the visual history of New York Harbor, the high tech world we all live in and the importance of sustainability in our future.

Building a playground is a relatively small thing to do for a community where we plan to live for the next 99 years. It will add to the visual beauty of our site looked at both from Richmond Terrace and from 625 feet in the air. We want our visitors to stay on our site for several hours after riding the wheel. We are including various elements to make that stay worthwhile, interesting and fun.

Frizzi and St. George, I would love you to think that I decided to build the playground for you, but the truth is that it was simply the right thing to do for the site. Thank you for the idea. We have had our landscape architects, M. Paul Friedberg & Partners, do a preliminary design showed below:

At one of the first community meetings I attended , a Staten Island woman approached me. Her name was Frizzi Linck and she is a voice pathologist and a resident of St. George. She was all swaddled up with a baby on her chest. She had a simple request; could our open space green roof include a playground for both local children like hers and possibly for visitors with small children. I said we would look into it. I’m sure she thought it was a standard non-committal response.

As I have previously explained in this blog, we have over 5 acres of planned open space on our green roof, with undulating hills and paths winding amongst the sustainability exhibit and its alternative energy generators (photovoltaic solar cells and vertical wind turbines). There was one portion of the roof plan, the Western-most portion near Nicholas Street which seemed lonely and underutilized.

So much to everyone’s surprise, we said yes, we would include a playground. When I next saw Frizzi, it was at a Community Board meeting and during the Q&A she asked again about the playground. This time I told her we had one planned based on her request. I’m not sure she believed me. Such is the inherent distrust for the developer in modern American society. While I’m sure it is a reputation that is well-earned, we consider ourselves less developers and more wheel builders. That may sound trite, but this is the only project we have underway and we are totally focused on doing it the right way to create a world-class venue that emphasizes the visual history of New York Harbor, the high tech world we all live in and the importance of sustainability in our future.

Building a playground is a relatively small thing to do for a community where we plan to live for the next 99 years. It will add to the visual beauty of our site looked at both from Richmond Terrace and from 625 feet in the air. We want our visitors to stay on our site for several hours after riding the wheel. We are including various elements to make that stay worthwhile, interesting and fun.